Glen Afraig, A Chartreuse Dream comes to glass.

“Chartreuse, the only liqueur so good they named a color after it.”

This famous quote from Quentin Tarantino‘s Death Proof demonstrates most bartender’s tastes, maybe not entirely mine. Chartreuse is good, don’t misread me, it’s just that so many times this french herbal liqueur is used more for her trendy aspect regardless of her flavor. Adding Chartreuse to any cocktail won’t make it better every time.

Cocktails should taste good, it seems obvious, but it is something people tend to forget. The first time I tasted a Chartreuse cocktail that I truly liked was a few years ago. The cocktail was by Dick Bradsell

Golden Retriever Cocktail

1 part of Green Chartreuse

1 part of Bacardi Superior

1 part of Cuarenta y tres liqueur (we use Galliano in Quebec due to lack (of a lot) of products)

Give a long stir, serve straight up in a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with an orange zest – *Diffords Guide

A sweet and rich cocktail where the Chartreuse enhances the taste instead of overpowering it. For me it was a revelation, since then it is still one of my favourite go to cocktails. I tried every twist of it, changing the spirit or the liqueur Cuarenta y tres but always keeping the French elixir. Some of them were good, some not so good. I finally got it. The Glean Afraig cocktail.

Chartreuse
Glean Afraig – Jonathan Homier’s cocktail tribute to the Dick Bradsell Chartreuse classic, Golden Retriever.

 

Glean Afraig

1 oz. Green Chartreuse

1 oz. Johnnie Walker Black Label

1 oz. Galliano

3 dashes Bittered Sling Suius Cherry

Give a long stir over large chunk of cracked ice

Serve in a teacup over ice and garnish with a shortbread cookie.

Glean Afraig is the region in Scotland from where the Golden retriever breed comes. A truly english concoction, the woody and spicy Johnnie Walker Black Label gives the backbone to this cocktail, Chartreuse gives it depth and emphasises the spices, the sweet vanilla flavour of the Galliano is a beautiful reminder of the bourbon barrels that are used to age Johnnie Walker. Canada’s own Bittered Sling Suius Cherry gives it personality, a delicate tart finish that lasts during the aftertaste. As for the teacup and the shortbread cookie, well you cannot go more English than that.

It might be far from the Chartreuse shots they’re having in Death Proof, but as Tarantino said himself in that movie,

“Is that a tasty beverage or is that a tasty bev-er-age?”

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