A Winter Negroni, warm and smooth for the cold months

 1 Part Averna Amaro

1 Part Remy Martin VSOP

1 Part Carpano Antica Formula

 Stir all ingredients with lots of ice, allowing proper dilution. Garnish with a blood orange slice.

 Tasting Notes:

 Nose: Floral and herbal with notes of fennel, orange, cloves and winter spices.

Palate: Smooth full mouthfeel, with an oily texture. The finish is long with herbs and citrus notes.

Perfect as an digestif. 

 My inspiration was the blood orange itself. After scanning my home bar and thinking what would be the best pairing, I decided to do a twist on one of my favourite classic cocktails: the Negroni.

At first I was not sure if the flavours would work but this is definitely a keeper. After savouring this cocktail for a couple hours, I dug out the thick slice of blood orange that had been absorbing all that fine liquid; it was almost better than my cocktail!

Winter Negroni

A recent trend is to treat the Negroni as a template, involving a base spirit, a bitters and a vermouth. Bars such as Amor y Amargo in New York, Mauro’s Negroni Club in Munich, Germany, Ohla in Barcelona, Spain and Negroni in Buenos Aires, Argentina among others, do this.

The ‘Negroni sbagliato’ (“wrong Negroni” in Italian) uses sparkling wine (e.g., prosecco) instead of gin. ‘Negroski’ is a recipe with vodka again as substitute for gin. ‘Cardinaloski’ is a Negroski with some angostura drops. ‘Punt e Mes Negroni’ instead replaces standard red vermouth with a specific, distinctively more bitter-tasting brand called Punt e Mes. The ‘Cin Cyn’ uses Cynar, an artichoke based liqueur, instead of Campari. Pinkish Negroni: with pinkish wine (instead of gin). The “Boulevardier” uses bourbon instead of gin. A “Raultini” is a variation using Aperol instead of Campari, giving its distinctive orange color, lighter alcohol content, and a bit of sweetness. The “Gran Classico Negroni” more complex and herbal, substitutes Gran Classico Bitter for the Campari.

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